Are you the kind of person who tells the same story over and over again? If you are, that's great because I'm one of those people, too. My family has spent a lot of their lives patiently listening to me tell a story they've already heard. On days when they're feeling generous, they let me keep talking. But sometimes they let me know I'm acting like a broken record. The re-telling of stories is one reason why I write and store all my sermons in Google. When I pick a story to use in a sermon, I first need to search through the hundreds of sermons I've already written. Sometimes I discover that I haven't used that story in a sermon since the days I was on internship in New York City. Yet, there have been times when I had forgotten I used that story just three weeks before. I consider the stories I tell over and over again to be stories worth sharing. But even I know a story can sometimes lose its meaning when it’s told too often.

One of the ways the church is unique is that we re-tell the same story every day. We are constantly dwelling in and sharing the story of Jesus. We remember how he casted out demons and offered healing to all. We celebrate the stories around his birth and how he saved the host of a wedding reception from being embarrassed when he turned water into wine. We also proclaim to each other and the world that Jesus refuses to give up on them. Unlike the stories I share, the story about Jesus never grows old because it's a story that always speaks to us in new ways. We re-tell the story of Jesus because His story helps us become the people God knows we can be.

So during this Lent, we're going to take some time to learn how to share Jesus' story. We'll do this by using Pixar's model for storytelling. In the space below and in the margins on this page, I want you to think about a moment when Jesus made a difference in your life. Hold that moment in your mind. Replay it over and over again. Relive that life-giving moment. Then I invite you to complete this sentence: One upon a time there was. . .