We start every new church year, every Advent, with the end of the world. Today's reading from the gospel according to Luke 21:25-36 is part of a longer sermon filled with Jesus' apocalyptic views. Like Daniel, Ezekiel, and Isaiah, Jesus' words are sprinkled with images of wars, starvation, persecution, and judgement. As we spend today lighting the first Advent candle and preparing to set out the nativity with a manger for a baby's bed, we are surrounded by words rooted in incredible violence. This text is jarring, masking the hope at the heart of Jesus' words. But hope is what Jesus is all about in Luke 21. And this hope is God's vision for the world. 

There's a pattern in the text that unwraps the hope Jesus is pointing to. The text begins with a vision, describing the earth in distress. Jesus then moves from a vision into a story, using a parable to tame the violence in the vision he previous shared. At the moment when the world trembles and it feels as if it will be covered in shadow, that is when summer will be on its way. The story is rooted in a promise - a promise that Jesus' words, ministry, and grace has a permanence that cannot be overcome. This vision, story, and promise is Jesus' reminder that, regardless of what we can see, there is still always more going on than meets the eye. We, as human begins, cannot see everything that God sees. We, with our limited perspective, cannot see everything else that's moving into place. And we, wrapped up in our sin, struggle to realize that we are not the center of the universe. By clinging to the promise that Jesus is truly God-with-us, we are wrapped up by a hope that does not end. Our relationship to God doesn't depend on us. Our relationship is rooted in a God who refuses to leave us on our own. Even when the world appears like it is coming apart at the seams, Jesus is still here. And we, as followers of Christ, are to stay alert, living our lives as if Jesus is really here right now. 

Dr. Michal Dinkler writes, "As we move into the Christmas season, let us not get so myopic in single-mindedly over-preparing for Christmas that we forget God’s vision for the world -- a vision that is God’s to control, a vision that is far broader and more expansive than either/or thinking can allow." Through your baptism and through your faith, you are with with God. This world, as we know, doesn't match the vision God has for it. But because of your faith, the kingdom of God is already here. As we start this new church year, we are reminded we spend all our years living into the hope that Jesus makes a difference today, yesterday, and forever.